Current Season

Home - Current Season - Past Seasons - Contact - Watch Now

Regular Schedule: SUNDAYS at 11:30AM, repeating MONDAYS at 5:00PM

Black Issues Forum: 3100 series (2015-2016)

July 17, 2016 Black Folk Do! — We'll ride horses with the Barnyard Bandits Saddle Club in Smithfield, run with Black Girls Run Greensboro, take a hike with the Neighborhood Ecology Corps with the Center for Human-Earth Restoration, and jump in the water with Aquablazers Swimming Team for sports and recreation Black Folk do! Featuring Black Issues Forum production intern Paris Alston.

July 10, 2016: Unspoken Truth about HIV/AIDS — Despite progress in the medical and social stigma realms, black North Carolinians are still suffering at staggering rates from HIV and AIDS. Bridgett Luckey and Drs. Allison Mathews and Adaora Adimora discuss how to continue and increase the fight against this terrible medical phenomenon. BIF intern Ayana Sadler also takes us to a 2BeatHIV event in Durham for more information about HIV research.

July 3, 2016: What is Race? — The concept of race is a complex matter, and often it is difficult to have a real conversation about race and ethnicity without tensions rising and offenses being launched. Deborah has a dialogue about the definition of race and more with Dr. Candis Watts Smith of UNC-Chapel Hill, Dr. Mark Anthony Neal of Duke University, and Samone Oates-Bullock, a student at UNC-CH.

June 26, 2016: Black Exploitation in College Sports — College sports are a beloved and time-honored tradition - but what does it mean when the athletes who provide the excitement of competition don't get the education that they were promised or proper compensation? Dwayne Ballen of CBS Sports, CL Brown of ESPN.com, and Dr. Deborah Stroman of UNC's Kenan-Flagler Business School flesh out the problems with big university athletic programs in the NCAA.

June 20, 2016: Empowering HBCU Alumni — After strong protest three North Carolina HBCUs were dropped from a bill that many claimed threatened the schools' viability. Can the alumni of these schools now breathe a sigh of relief? Andrea Harris of the North Carolina Institute for Minority Economic Developmeny and Ty Couey, founder and President of the National HBCU Alumni Association and National Organization of College Parents, discuss.

June 13, 2016: Wilmington on Fire — November 10, 1898 was an important and tragic day in Wilmington's and North Carolina's history, yet very few people know about what took place on that fall day all those years ago. Filmmaker Christopher Everett explores this crucial historical moment in his new documentary, Wilmington on Fire, and Deborah sits down with him to learn more about why he wanted to tell this story.

June 6, 2016: Roundtable Talk: Election Concerns for Voters of Color — This is an important election year for North Carolinians, yet there are so many barriers that voters of color are facing when it comes to their basic right to express their voices. Deborah chats with Kerra Bolton, David Joyner, and John White - three NC political experts and strategists who have ideas about how voters of color can protect their votes as well as their ability to go to the polls.

May 29, 2016: HBCUs Reengineered for the Future — Historically black colleges and universities are facing new challenges to their resources, and administrators all over the state are working hard to strengthen their schools for the future. Deborah sits with Dr. Corey Walker of Winston-Salem State University and Edith Bartley of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund to discuss what HBCUs are doing to better serve their students and communities.

May 22, 2016: Sisters in Medicine — Deborah heads to Rocky Mount to learn about the predominantly female African-American medical team at the Opportunities Industrialization Center - the OIC - a multi-purpose resource center that focuses on health. These doctors, nurses, and dentists are working to both improve health disparities in Eastern NC and to educate their patients about the virtues of medicine and health care.

May 15, 2016: Cut from Different Cloths — A look back at the gowns of black dressmaker Willie Otey Kay who in the 1950’s established a small but self-sustaining family enterprise designing one-of-a-kind special occasion gowns for Raleigh’s black and white elite, then a visit with young entrepreneur James Murchison of Raleigh and a motivated NCA&T student in fashion design and merchandising Wes Rowe who will show off their clothing designs and talk about their efforts to try and build their careers and business opportunities in the fashion industry.

May 8, 2016: Finding Home Inside Your House — The concept of "home" can mean so many different things, and artists in particular choose to express their feelings towards their homes in various ways. Deborah sits down with filmmakers and artists Hope Azeda, Naimah Fuller, and Destini Riley to figure out  just how these creative women show their audiences the role that their homes play in their everyday lives.

May 1, 2016: The Complexities of Skin Color — Inspired by the casting of Latina actress Zoe Saldana to play Nina Simone, the performer and activist known for her pride in her dark skin, Deborah chats with professor Dr. Yaba Blay, filmmaker Eric Barstow, and undergraduate student Ayana Thompson to delve into why so many people still knowingly and unknowingly participate in colorism - the assertion that light is better.

April 24, 2016: The Art of Cool — We have a special treat for you this week! We are all about the Art of Cool Festival in Durham for this program, and Deborah sits down with co-founders Cicely Mitchell and Al Strong to learn what makes this gathering so popular. Plus, Al and his bandmates gear up for not one but two amazing song performances, recorded at UNC-TV's studio. Join us as we get our groove on!

April 17, 2016: Dr. Shaun Harper Live at Duke — Join Deborah Holt Noel at the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture at Duke University with race and higher education scholar Dr. Shaun Harper.  Dr. Harper founded the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 and was the keynoter for Duke University's annual MLK Commemoration.  This past summer, he co-authored a study about school suspension rates in the south and found that in North Carolina black students comprised 26% of the student population but were 51% of students who were suspended. Share your questions and comments via Twitter using @UNCTV or #ncblackissues.

April 10, 2016: Ban the Box: Right or Risky? — Many activists in North Carolina argue that the criminal record box on job applications should be abolished. Rep. Garland Pierce of District 48 in the North Carolina House of Representatives, Umar Muhammad with the Southern Coalition for Social Justice, and Daniel Bowes with the North Carolina Justice Center address some of the questions around how this move can help and where the risks lie.

April 3, 2016: The Expense of Affordable Care Millions of Americans struggle to understand the Affordable Care Act and their current health care options. Benjamin Money of the North Carolina Community Health Center Association, Jennifer Simmons of the North Carolina Navigator Consortium, and Adam Linker of the Health Access Coalition at the North Carolina Justice Center take on this issue and help clarify some of the choices Americans have.  For information about open enrollment or submitting an application for health insurance, click here.

March 27, 2016: Helping the Homeless and Hungry —  At a certain time of year, more eyes and hearts get focused on people out there in need of food, clothing, and shelter.  But it's a need we all know exists throughout the year.  There are many organizations doing work to address the needs, but how do they operate?  Gene Nichol, a Boyd Tinsley Distinguished Professor of Law at UNC-Chapel Hill and a worker at the North Carolina Poverty Research Fund; Earline Middleton, the Vice President of Agency Services & Programs at the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina; and Sam Whitted, the Tenant Advocate & President of Alumni at Housing for New Hope and former homeless person provide insights.

March 21, 2016: Mystery of Fibroids Explored — Every year, billions of dollars go toward research and treatment of the deadly disease cancer.  But a condition does not need to be deadly to kill off your enjoyment of life.  The National Institutes of Health has referenced a finding that by age 50, 70 percent of white and 80 percent of African American women had fibroids.  Up until now, for a lot of women, the treatment had been hysterectomy.  But today, there are growing efforts to understand this condition and explore treatment options including a significant study in North Carolina.  Find out about some of that work that's happening right here in North Carolina and how you can get involved as we talk to Dr. Phyllis Leppert, Emerita Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Duke University and president of the Campion Fund research and funding agency on uterine fibroids, Dr. Wanda Nicholson, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and Dr. Darlene K. Taylor, an Associate Professor of Chemistry at North Carolina Central University doing research on drug therapies for uterine fibroids. Also in our Profiles Encourage series, former Miss Black America Paula Gwynn Grant shares how a history of fibroids impacted her life and career and what she has done to overcome and help other women who suffer.

March 14, 2016: Black College Students Matter —  Black students at predominantly white universities say they have endured unacceptable racist treatment long enough.  A successful campaign  at the University of Missouri to oust ineffective leadership on the issue has motivated similar movements at schools nationwide, including Duke University.  Duke University's President of the Black Student Alliance Henry L. Washington, Jr., the President of the Black Graduate & Professional Student Association Seth C. Pearson, and the Chief Diversity Officer in the Office For Institutional Equity Dr. Ben Reese share accounts and views on the kind of racial atmosphere they have experienced on their campus and what steps they are taking to feel a more welcome part of their university family.

March 7, 2016 : Charter Schools Stay the Course —  Charter schools frequently find themselves under fire, and it doesn’t help when promises to deliver on student performance fall short. But a group of African American leaders of charter schools say often times there’s more to the story, and they want to let the public in on it as well as provide a network of support and assistance to other school leaders to help them make their schools the best they can be. I'd like to introduce today's guests: Dr. Simon Johnson, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Quality Education Academy in Winston-Salem; Don McQueen, Co-Founder of Torchlight Academy, a K through 5 public charter school in Raleigh; and Eugene Slocum, Co-Founder of Alpha Academy Public Charter School in Fayetteville. 

February 29, 2016: A Brief Case for Diversity  Shelton A. Russell, Publisher of American DBE magazine, and Patrice Gilmore, Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion at Holt Brothers Construction, Inc. share how more minority business enterprises or MBE’s can make sure they’re positioned to take advantage of growth opportunities.  Also, in "Profiles Encourage," learn more about Ms. Gilmore, who was  recently recognized by Triangle Business Journal as one of their 40 under 40 for 2015 for her outstanding work developing relationships with minority suppliers. 

February 21, 2016: Close Encounters with The Law   If you were approached by the police in your car or on foot, would you know what to do to avoid unnecessary conflict?  Join us as we discuss the best strategies for handling an encounter with a law enforcement officer. Retired Durham Deputy Police Chief Beverly "BJ" Council, the founder of You and Five-O, and Ron Mangum, an educator and Employee Relations specialist, both sit down to help viewers understand what police officers and citizens alike can do to prevent unsafe situations from developing.

February 14, 2016: Producer Laurens Grant on Black Panthers Film Emmy-award winning producer Laurens Grant shares her experience in researching and producing The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, a documentary film about the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party.  Independent Lens brings this two-hour documentary by filmmaker/director Stanley Nelson to public television for the first time, February 16, 2016.

February 7, 2016: Diagnosis Bias — When Dr. Damon Tweedy isn’t practicing as a physician at the Durham VA, he’s busy teaching classes at the Duke University Medical School.  Not long ago, however, he was busy penning his memoir that has now become a New York Times best-seller Black Man in a White Coat:  A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine.  He shares some of his experiences and discoveries as reflected in his now famous New York Times op-ed The Case for Black Doctors  and in his new book.

January 31, 2016: Pauli Murray, Sainted Activist   An exhibit at The Scrap Exchange in Durham highlights the work and personhood of the late Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray, a North Carolinian who pushed barriers of racial, gender, and sexual identity discrimination pre-Civil Rights. Educator and Director of the Pauli Murray Project Barbara Lau and Durham resident and board chair for the Pauli Murray Project Mayme Webb-Bledsoe discuss ongoing work to preserve Murray's original home and rebuilt it into a community center, and they share insights about this human rights activist who was also the first African American woman to become an Episcopal priest. Also in Black Issues Forum's "Profiles Encourage" series, meet Terry Spicer, founder of The Sisters Inspiring Sisters Inc., a nonprofit that is fueling hope for cancer survivors by assisting with cost for transportation to and from cancer treatment.

January 24, 2016: Land, Environment, & Race Deborah sits down with Mickey Fearn, Professor of Practice in the School of Natural Resources at North Carolina State University; Marilynn Marsh-Robinson, Partnership and Alliances Manager with the Environmental Defense Fund; and Thomas Easley, a Professor at NCSU, all experts in environmental justice and the importance of going outside and enjoying nature for African-Americans. 

January 17, 2016:  Dr. Shaun Harper Live at DukeJoin Deborah Holt Noel LIVE at the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture at Duke University with race and higher education scholar Dr. Shaun Harper.  Dr. Harper founded the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 and is the keynoter for Duke University's annual MLK Commemoration.  This past summer, he co-authored a study about school suspension rates in the south and found that in North Carolina black students comprised 26% of the student population, but were 51% students who were suspended.  Share your questions and comments via Twitter using @UNCTV or #ncblackissues.

January 10, 2016 - Ban the Box: Right or Risky?— Many activists in North Carolina argue that the criminal record box on job applications should be abolished. Rep. Garland Pierce of District 48 in the North Carolina House of Representatives, Umar Muhammad with the Southern Coalition for Social Justice, and Daniel Bowes with the North Carolina Justice Center address some of the questions around how this move can help and where the risks lie.

January 3, 2016 - The Expense of Affordable CareMillions of Americans struggle to understand the Affordable Care Act and their current health care options. Benjamin Money of the North Carolina Community Health Center Association, Jennifer Simmons of the North Carolina Navigator Consortium, and Adam Linker of the Health Access Coalition at the North Carolina Justice Center take on this issue and help clarify some of the choices Americans have.  For information about open enrollment or submitting an application for health insurance, click here.

December 27, 2015: Center for Alzheimers Caregivers — Alzheimer's Disease affects more than 5.2 million Americans every year, and African Americans are twice as likely as whites to have Alzheimer's. But thanks to the passion, leadership, and tireless work of researcher Dr. Goldie Byrd, North Carolina A&T in Greensboro is the birthplace and home to vital initiatives in Alzheimer's research in African Americans and outreach. Dr. Byrd and Takiyah Starks talk about COAACH (Center for Outeach in Alzheimer's, Aging, and Community Health), the annual caregivers conference, and more.

December 20, 2015 - Helping for the Homeless and Hungry —  At a certain time of year, more eyes and hearts get focused on people out there in need of food, clothing, and shelter.  But it's a need we all know exists throughout the year.  There are many organizations doing work to address the needs, but how do they operate?  Gene Nichol, a Boyd Tinsley Distinguished Professor of Law at UNC-Chapel Hill and a worker at the North Carolina Poverty Research Fund; Earline Middleton, the Vice President of Agency Services & Programs at the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina; and Sam Whitted, the Tenant Advocate & President of Alumni at Housing for New Hope and former homeless person provide insights.


December 14, 2014: Saint Ambrose Episcopal Jazz Mass — Each Sunday at Saint Ambrose Episcopal Church in Raleigh, congregants worship to hymns and music instrumentalized in the jazz style. The church quartet Moment's Notice performs holiday and religious music in their unique style, and lead musician Bobby Moody talks about the group's music career and long standing tradition at Saint Ambrose


December 7, 2015 - Mystery of Fibroids Explored
Every year, billions of dollars go toward research and treatment of the deadly disease cancer.  But a condition does not need to be deadly to kill off your enjoyment of life.  The National Institutes of Health has referenced a finding that by age 50, 70 percent of white and 80 percent of African American women had fibroids.  Up until now, for a lot of women, the treatment had been hysterectomy.  But today, there are growing efforts to understand this condition and explore treatment options including a significant study in North Carolina.  Find out about some of that work that's happening right here in North Carolina and how you can get involved as we talk to Dr. Phyllis Leppert, Emerita Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Duke University and president of the Campion Fund research and funding agency on uterine fibroids, Dr. Wanda Nicholson, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and Dr. Darlene K. Taylor, an Associate Professor of Chemistry at North Carolina Central University doing research on drug therapies for uterine fibroids. Also in our Profiles Encourage series, former Miss Black America Paula Gwynn Grant shares how a history of fibroids impacted her life and career and what she has done to overcome and help other women who suffer.

November 29, 2015 - Black College Students Matter—  Black students at predominantly white universities say they have endured unacceptable racist treatment long enough.  A successful campaign  at the University of Missouri to oust ineffective leadership on the issue has motivated similar movements at schools nationwide, including Duke University.  Duke University's President of the Black Student Alliance Henry L. Washington, Jr., the President of the Black Graduate & Professional Student Association Seth C. Pearson, and the Chief Diversity Officer in the Office For Institutional Equity Dr. Ben Reese share accounts and views on the kind of racial atmosphere they have experienced on their campus and what steps they are taking to feel a more welcome part of their university family.

November 22, 2015 - Charter Schools Stay the Course —  Charter schools frequently find themselves under fire, and it doesn’t help when promises to deliver on student performance fall short. But a group of African American leaders of charter schools say often times there’s more to the story, and they want to let the public in on it as well as provide a network of support and assistance to other school leaders to help them make their schools the best they can be. I'd like to introduce today's guests: Dr. Simon Johnson, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Quality Education Academy in Winston-Salem; Don McQueen, Co-founder of Torchlight Academy, a K through 5 public charter school in Raleigh; and Eugene Slocum, Co-Founder of Alpha Academy Public Charter School in Fayetteville.

November 15, 2015 - A Brief Case for Diversity  Shelton A. Russell, Publisher of American DBE magazine, and Patrice Gilmore, Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion at Holt Brothers Construction, Inc. share how more minority business enterprises or MBE’s can make sure they’re positioned to take advantage of growth opportunities.  Also, in "Profiles Encourage," learn more about Ms. Gilmore who was  recently recognized by Triangle Business Journal as one of their 40 under 40 for 2015 for her outstanding work developing relationships with minority suppliers. 

November 8, 2015 - Close Encounters with The Law   If you were approached by the police in your car or on foot, would you know what to do to avoid unnecessary conflict?  Join us as we discuss the best strategies for handling an encounter with a law enforcement officer. Retired Durham Deputy Police Chief Beverly "B.J." Council, the founder of You and Five-O, and Ron Mangum, an educator and Employee Relations specialist, both sit down to help viewers understand what police officers and citizens alike can do to prevent unsafe situations from developing.

November 1, 2015:  Diagnosis Bias   When Dr. Damon Tweedy isn’t practicing as a physician at the Durham VA, he’s busy teaching classes at the Duke University Medical School.  Not long ago, however, he was busy penning his memoir that has now become a New York Times best-seller Black Man in a White Coat:  A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine.  He shares some of his experiences and discoveries as reflected in his now famous New York Times op-ed The Case for Black Doctors  and in his new book.

October 25, 2015:  Pauli Murray:  Sainted Activist   An exhibit at The Scrap Exchange in Durham highlights the work and personhood of the late Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray, a North Carolinian who pushed barriers of racial, gender, and sexual identity discrimination pre-Civil Rights.  Educator and Director of the Pauli Murray Project Barbara Lau and Durham resident and board chair for the Pauli Murray Project Mayme Webb-Bledsoe discuss ongoing work to preserve Murray's original home and rebuilt it into a community center, and they share insights about this human rights activist who was also the first African American woman to become an Episcopal priest.  Also in Black Issues Forum's new "Profiles Encourage" series, meet Terry Spicer, founder of The Sisters Inspiring Sisters Inc., a nonprofit that is fueling hope for cancer survivors by assisting with cost for transportation to and from cancer treatment.

October 18, 2015:  Filmmaker Examines Beauty Ideal — In her upcoming documentary "Baartman, Beyoncé and Me" filmmaker Natalie Bullock Brown plans to explore the  roots of the American beauty ideal and ask how it affects the self-perception and treatment of African American women and girls in our society.  She's joined by Omisade Burney-Scott of Ananse Consulting and Duke University professor Dr. Mark Anthony Neal to share their thoughts on the subject.

October 11, 2015:  Artists Open Dialog on Race — Non-profit leaders in Greensboro talk about  an exciting upcoming public event Art Plus Dialogue: Responding to Racial Tension in America that will use art, dance, music, and more to start conversations about race.  Organizers Laura Way of Greenhill; Dr. Dara Nix-Stevenson with the Center for Visual Artists, and Ivan Canada of the National Conference for Community and Justice discuss.

October 4, 2015:  Sow Much Good — Robin Emmons left her job in corporate America to plant seeds and dig in the dirt.  Now she's discovered her passion for growing fresh produce in sustainable ways to feed, educate, and advocate for marginalized communities.  Her work has also earned her recognition as a William C. Friday Fellow for Human Relations. She talks about her non-profit, Sow Much Good.

September 27, 2015:  Movement of Youth — Young CEO Atrayus Goode shares how the intervention of a mentor through 100 Black Men of Charlotte helped him choose the right roads growing up to later attend college and found a mentoring organization of his own.  While attending UNC Chapel Hill, Atrayus founded Movement of Youth which has grown into a successful, multiple county network of college students who mentor high school students.

September 20, 2015: Black Writers of Children's Books — Award Award-winners in children's books publishing, author Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrator Vanessa Brantly Newton discuss the importance of diverse characters and subject matter, how to use books to talk with children about difficult social issues, and the real gatekeeping and institutional challenges African Americans face in publishing.

September 13, 2015: Violence is a Public Health Concern — It's already argued today that gun violence is a public health crisis. If so, all the more is overall violence in communities. At this year's National Health Equity Research Webcast, experts in the field of health equity will be talking about Advancing a Community-based Model for Violence Prevention. This webcast is an outgrowth of the Minority Health Project at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health and reaches researchers, educators, administrators, practitioners and students in public health. Join Nia Wilson, the Executive Director of SpiritHouse in Durham; Leon Andrews, Jr., the Director of REAL, Race, Equity And Leadership in the National League of Cities based in Washington, DC, and Dr. Stephanie Baker White, a faculty member at UNC Greensboro as they share what they're doing to help empower communities in violence prevention.

September 6, 2015: Opening Doors in Travel & Tourism — Visitors to North Carolina spend over $55 million a day in the hospitality industry, and nationwide tourism supports the jobs of more than 7 million workers. In this discussion, one of only 32 African American B&B owners and a millennial who's achieved managerial status in the hotel industry share their thoughts about African Americans as consumers, workers, and business owners in hospitality.

August 30, 2015: Estate Planning — Studies show less than 50% of Americans have a will in place. In this discussion, find out why it's so important to have this documentation in place, regardless of how much or how little you think your assets or financial worth are. Sharing the basics are guests Clemonte Mills and Ed Fulbright, CPA, PA. Mills is President of Mills Funeral Home, a full-service family owned funeral home in Kinston. Fulbright is a Certified Public Accountant with Fulbright & Fulbright CPA PA, a professional Money Coach, and host of the weekly radio show "Mastering Your Money," which airs Sunday evenings at 6PM on 90.7 FM WNCU Radio.

August 23, 2015: NCCU Coach LeVelle MotonLeVelle Moton is the championship coach of NCCU's men's basketball team and a North Carolina success story. In his book The Worst Times are the Best Times he shares his most vulnerable moments and emotions as a boy growing up without a father in the projects of Boston then Raleigh and builds these touchstones into a tower of lessons on how to  overcome obstacles and achieve success in life.

August 17, 2015: Behind The Secret Game — In 1944 American soldiers were engaged abroad in World War II, but in North Carolina blacks and whites moved to the rhythm of a complex dance called Jim Crow. Still, a courageous act involving blacks and whites occurred right in Durham, kept secret, until now. Hear details about the game as author Scott Ellsworth shares insights from his book The Secret Game.

August 10, 2015: Roadmap to Youth Success Pt. 2 — In this second discussion about using data from the Public School Forum of North Carolina's Roadmap of Need to craft programming and strategies to  improve student outcomes in a community, learn about a public school in Winston Salem that is helping students boost academic achievement against all odds. Dr. Essie McKoy, Principal at David H. Petree Elementary School and Shayne Willis, Petree's Curriculum Coordinator, share how they joined forces with other school educators and parents to improve student performance. They are joined by economic development strategist Dr. Jonathan Q. Morgan, Associate Professor of Public Administration and Government with the UNC School of Government.

August 2, 2015: Roadmap to Youth Success Pt. 1 — Join the State Superintendent of the Public Schools of North Carolina Dr. June Atkinson along with the President and Executive Director of the Public School Forum of North Carolina Keith Poston as they discuss data reported in the Forum's Roadmap of Need and how education stakeholders including parents, non-profits, and educators can use the information to shape programs in their communities that increase potential for student success.

July 26, 2015: Breaking Ground as a Black Quarterback — In 1964, Jimmy Raye left Fayetteville to enroll at Michigan State University. Little did he know that while he was there, he would become a trailblazer helping to change the game of college football forever. His story is captured in the book "Raye of Light" by Tom Shanahan, and includes insight into the integration of college football and the role of the Michigan State Spartans in it. He is the South's first black quarterback to win a national title, on the Michigan State Spartans' 1966 team; a trailblazer among college and NFL black coaches having served as one of the first black NFL assistants in 1977 with the San Francisco 49ers and one of the first black coordinators in 1983 with the Los Angeles Rams.

July 19, 2015:  Filmmaker Examines Beauty Ideal — In her upcoming documentary "Baartman, Beyoncé and Me" filmmaker Natalie Bullock Brown plans to explore the  roots of the American beauty ideal and ask how it affects the self-perception and treatment of African American women and girls in our society.  She's joined by Omisade Burney-Scott of Ananse Consulting and Duke University professor Dr. Mark Anthony Neal to share their thoughts on the subject.

July 12, 2015:  Artists Open Dialog on Race — Non-profit leaders in Greensboro talk about  an exciting upcoming public event Art Plus Dialogue: Responding to Racial Tension in America that will use art, dance, music, and more to start conversations about race.  Organizers Laura Way of Greenhill; Dr. Dara Nix-Stevenson with the Center for Visual Artists, and Ivan Canada of the National Conference for Community and Justice discuss.

July 5, 2015:  Sow Much Good — Robin Emmons left her job in corporate America to plant seeds and dig in the dirt.  Now she's discovered her passion for growing fresh produce in sustainable ways to feed, educate, and advocate for marginalized communities.  Her work has also earned her recognition as a William C. Friday Fellow for Human Relations. She talks about her non-profit, Sow Much Good.

June 28, 2015:  Movement of Youth — Young CEO Atrayus Goode shares how the intervention of a mentor through 100 Black Men of Charlotte helped him choose the right roads growing up to later attend college and found a mentoring organization of his own.  While attending UNC Chapel Hill, Atrayus founded Movement of Youth which has grown into a successful, multiple county network of college students who mentor high school students.

June 21, 2015: Black Writers of Children's Books — Award Award-winners in children's books publishing, author Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrator Vanessa Brantly Newton discuss the importance of diverse characters and subject matter, how to use books to talk with children about difficult social issues, and the real gatekeeping and institutional challenges African Americans face in publishing.

June 14, 2015: Violence is a Public Health Concern — It's already argued today that gun violence is a public health crisis. If so, all the more is overall violence in communities. At this year's National Health Equity Research Webcast, experts in the field of health equity will be talking about Advancing a Community-based Model for Violence Prevention. This webcast is an outgrowth of the Minority Health Project at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health and reaches researchers, educators, administrators, practitioners and students in public health. Join Nia Wilson, the Executive Director of SpiritHouse in Durham; Leon Andrews, Jr., the Director of REAL, Race, Equity And Leadership in the National League of Cities based in Washington, DC, and Dr. Stephanie Baker White, a faculty member at UNC Greensboro as they share what they're doing to help empower communities in violence prevention.

June 7, 2015: Center for Alzheimers Caregivers — Alzheimer's Disease affects more than 5.2 million Americans every year, and African Americans are twice as likely as whites to have Alzheimer's. But thanks to the passion, leadership, and tireless work of researcher Dr. Goldie Byrd, North Carolina A&T in Greensboro is the birthplace and home to vital initiatives in Alzheimer's research in African Americans and outreach. Dr. Byrd and Takiyah Starks talk about COAACH (Center for Outeach in Alzheimer's, Aging, and Community Health), the annual caregivers conference, and more.

June 1, 2015: Dudley High's AVT Team — Dudley High School, established in 1929, had rich involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, and today is continuing to impact the world, but through a very unique engineering program. Instructor Ricky Lewis and Former Le Mans Race Car Driver Jim Smith guide students in Dudley's Advanced Vehicle Technology (AVT) Team as they build an electric car to compete in the Shell Eco Marathon and discuss the importance of STEM learning.

May 24, 2015: Opening Doors in Travel & Tourism — Visitors to North Carolina spend over $55 million a day in the hospitality industry, and nationwide tourism supports the jobs of more than 7 million workers. In this discussion, one of only 32 African American B&B owners and a millennial who's achieved managerial status in the hotel industry share their thoughts about African Americans as consumers, workers, and business owners in hospitality.

May 17, 2015: Estate Planning — Studies show less than 50% of Americans have a will in place. In this discussion, find out why it's so important to have this documentation in place, regardless of how much or how little you think your assets or financial worth are. Sharing the basics are guests Clemonte Mills and Ed Fulbright, CPA, PA. Mills is President of Mills Funeral Home, a full-service family owned funeral home in Kinston. Fulbright is a Certified Public Accountant with Fulbright & Fulbright CPA PA, a professional Money Coach, and host of the weekly radio show "Mastering Your Money," which airs Sunday evenings at 6PM on 90.7 FM WNCU Radio.

May 10, 2015: NCCU Coach LeVelle MotonLeVelle Moton is the championship coach of NCCU's men's basketball team and a North Carolina success story. In his book The Worst Times are the Best Times he shares his most vulnerable moments and emotions as a boy growing up without a father in the projects of Boston then Raleigh and builds these touchstones into a tower of lessons on how to  overcome obstacles and achieve success in life.

May 3, 2015: Behind The Secret Game — In 1944 American soldiers were engaged abroad in World War II, but in North Carolina blacks and whites moved to the rhythm of a complex dance called Jim Crow. Still, a courageous act involving blacks and whites occurred right in Durham, kept secret, until now. Hear details about the game as author Scott Ellsworth shares insights from his book The Secret Game.

April 26, 2015: Roadmap to Youth Success Pt. 2 — In this second discussion about using data from the Public School Forum of North Carolina's Roadmap of Need to craft programming and strategies to  improve student outcomes in a community, learn about a public school in Winston Salem that is helping students boost academic achievement against all odds. Dr. Essie McKoy, Principal at David H. Petree Elementary School and Shayne Willis, Petree's Curriculum Coordinator, share how they joined forces with other school educators and parents to improve student performance. They are joined by economic development strategist Dr. Jonathan Q. Morgan, Associate Professor of Public Administration and Government with the UNC School of Government.

April 19, 2015: Roadmap to Youth Success Pt. 1 — Join the State Superintendent of the Public Schools of North Carolina Dr. June Atkinson along with the President and Executive Director of the Public School Forum of North Carolina Keith Poston as they discuss data reported in the Forum's Roadmap of Need and how education stakeholders including parents, non-profits, and educators can use the information to shape programs in their communities that increase potential for student success.

April 12, 2015: Breaking Ground as a Black Quarterback — In 1964, Jimmy Raye left Fayetteville to enroll at Michigan State University. Little did he know that while he was there, he would become a trailblazer helping to change the game of college football forever. His story is captured in the book "Raye of Light" by Tom Shanahan, and includes insight into the integration of college football and the role of the Michigan State Spartans in it. He is the South's first black quarterback to win a national title, on the Michigan State Spartans' 1966 team; a trailblazer among college and NFL black coaches having served as one of the first black NFL assistants in 1977 with the San Francisco 49ers and one of the first black coordinators in 1983 with the Los Angeles Rams.

April 5, 2015: Center for Alzheimers Caregivers — Alzheimer's Disease affects more than 5.2 million Americans every year, and African Americans are twice as likely as whites to have Alzheimer's. But thanks to the passion, leadership, and tireless work of researcher Dr. Goldie Byrd, North Carolina A&T in Greensboro is the birthplace and home to vital initiatives in Alzheimer's research in African Americans and outreach. Dr. Byrd and Takiyah Starks talk about COAACH (Center for Outeach in Alzheimer's, Aging, and Community Health), the annual caregivers conference, and more.

March 29, 2015: Men at Art — What is black art? It probably depends on who you ask. Find out how three different visual artists making their marks in North Carolina are defining this term and their work. Eric McRay, Richard Wilson, Jr., and LeGrant Taylor share their work and their views on issues that exist for African American artists.

March 22, 2015: The Holt Brothers Foundation — At the age of 10, NFL Super Bowl Champion Torry Holt lost his mother to cancer. Now, he and his brother Terry have established the Holt Brothers Foundation with a commitment to help children of adults with cancer cope and find joy. He talks about programs supported by the foundation plus the Holt Brothers' other business ventures in North Carolina.

March 15, 2015: African American Music Trails — A new book African American Music Trails of Eastern North Carolina takes readers to eight different counties in Eastern North Carolina to discover the culture and heritage of this region as told by African American music and musicians. Guests Michelle Lanier, co-author of the book as well as an oral history historian, folklorist and Director of the North Carolina African American Heritage Commission; Bill Myers, a retired educator and renowned musician in Wilson who's been a resource on the project since its inception and is also a 2014 North Carolina Heritage Award Recipient; and Wayne Martin, executive director of the North Carolina Arts Council, the group that created the music and literary trails series, share some of the history and the music.

March 8, 2015: The Howard Lee Institute — Howard N. Lee has served North Carolina as Senator, Mayor, Chair of the State Board of Education, and Director of the state's Education Cabinet under Governor Beverly Perdue. Today his work for the community endures through the Howard N. Lee Institute. He shares his vision for the organization and commentary on the current status of African American boys.

March 1, 2015: Policing and the Black Community — Recent cases of police killing unarmed blacks Eric Garner, Michael Brown, and the young boy Tamir Rice  raised public furor over equal justice.    Chief James Moore of the Police Department for the City of Rocky Mount and Chris Herring, Executive Director of the Institute for Homeland Security and Workforce Development at NCCU, share what both law enforcement agencies and the public can do to build trust and safety for everyone.

February 22, 2015: Parenting, Discipline & Self-Control — As the public debates whether or not NFL star Adrian Peterson should face child abuse charges for beating his four-year-old with a switch, the question about how to effectively discipline today's children remains. Dr. April Harris-Britt, a licensed Psychologist with AHB Center for Behavioral Health and Wellness, SAFEchild Clinical Supervisor and Program Coordinator Stacy Sullivan, and Keith Copeland, a Parenting Workshop Facilitator, discuss research around physical disciplinary measures, punishment and reward, abuse, and how to parent with effective results.

February 15, 2015: Dudley High's AVT Team — Dudley High School, established in 1929, had rich involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, and today is continuing to impact the world, but through a very unique engineering program. Instructor Ricky Lewis and Former Le Mans Race Car Driver Jim Smith guide students in Dudley's Advanced Vehicle Technology (AVT) Team as they build an electric car to compete in the Shell Eco Marathon and discuss the importance of STEM learning.

February 8, 2015: Dr. Ada M. Fisher — The 2014 midterm election is over, and Republicans won big. What does this mean for African Americans, most of whom identify as Democrats, and their concerns around health care and immigration reform, education and more? Dr. Ada M. Fisher, the only African American woman in the North Carolina GOP, answers these concerns from her book Common Sense Conservative Prescriptions: Solutions for What Ails Us.

February 1, 2015: StepUp Ministry — The Raleigh-based nonprofit StepUp Ministry celebrates 25 successful years of changing lives through job placement, financial literacy, and more. Executive Director Linda Nunnallee, recent program graduate Bobby Atkinston, and volunteer Brandon Lowery talk about StepUp's programs and services including GG's Closet and an entrepreneurship program that's helped both men start their own businesses.

January 25, 2015: Polished Souls' Mike AndersonMike Rae Anderson says "Every Diamond in the Rough is a Soul that deserves to be Polished," and he's working to be part of the fire that helps shape the souls of today's young people. Learn about how this ex-offender, who once faced the death penalty, turned from an abusive childhood and life of crime to the CEO of a foundation called Polished Souls Foundation, Inc. with future plans for a charter school.

January 18, 2015: Charter School Moves to Watch — Charter schools are a viable alternative for parents exploring public school options. Darrell Allison, President of Parents for Educational Freedom in North Carolina, is joined with Joe Ableidinger, Senior Director of Policy and Programs with the Public School Forum of North Carolina, to share new innovations that are increasing accessiblity to charter schools plus questions and factors for parents to consider in their decision-making.

January 11, 2015: Celebrate MLK with Sounds of Justice — Featuring diverse music genres from classical to jazz, Duke University assembles a weekend celebration befitting a king for the 2015 Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. Join Dr. Ben Reese, co-chair of the MLK Planning Committee at Duke University and vice president for the Duke University Office for Institutional Equity, along with Grammy-nominated bassist, composer, educator, actor and Director of the Jazz Program at Duke University John Brown as they give all the details behind the Sounds of Justice and Inclusion concert plus other weekend activities including a keynote by North Carolina NAACP President Rev. Dr. William A. Barber. 


January 4, 2015: Policing and the Black Community — Recent cases of police killing unarmed blacks Eric Garner, Michael Brown, and the young boy Tamir Rice  raised public furor over equal justice.    Chief James Moore of the Police Department for the City of Rocky Mount and Chris Herring, Executive Director of the Institute for Homeland Security and Workforce Development at NCCU, share what both law enforcement agencies and the public can do to build trust and safety for everyone.

December 28, 2014: Parenting, Discipline & Self-Control — As the public debates whether or not NFL star Adrian Peterson should face child abuse charges for beating his four-year-old with a switch, the question about how to effectively discipline today's children remains. Dr. April Harris-Britt, a licensed Psychologist with AHB Center for Behavioral Health and Wellness, SAFEchild Clinical Supervisor and Program Coordinator Stacy Sullivan, and Keith Copeland, a Parenting Workshop Facilitator, discuss research around physical disciplinary measures, punishment and reward, abuse, and how to parent with effective results.

December 21, 2014: Saint Ambrose Episcopal Jazz Mass — Each Sunday at Saint Ambrose Episcopal Church in Raleigh, congregants worship to hymns and music instrumentalized in the jazz style. The church quartet Moment's Notice performs holiday and religious music in their unique style, and lead musician Bobby Moody talks about the group's music career and long standing tradition at Saint Ambrose.


December 15, 2014: Howard Fuller - Black Power to School Reform — A major figure in North Carolina's Black Power and anti-poverty movements, Howard Fuller is today a strong advocate for education and parental choice. He shares stories about his journey and life lessons as recounted in his new book No Struggle No Progress: A Warrior's Life from Black Power to Education Reform.

December 8, 2014: Jason Mott Writes Another Wonder — New York Times Bestseller and Wilmington native Jason Mott discusses his new novel The Wonder of All Things, which has already been optioned for screen rights by Lionsgate Entertainment Studios. Mott's first novel The Returned is now the hit TV show Resurrection on ABC. He shares the plot of his new release, which like The Returned explores the supernatural and unexplained.


November 30, 2014: Dr. Ada M. Fisher — The 2014 midterm election is over, and Republicans won big. What does this mean for African Americans, most of whom identify as Democrats, and their concerns around health care and immigration reform, education and more? Dr. Ada M. Fisher, the only African American woman in the North Carolina GOP, answers these concerns from her book Common Sense Conservative Prescriptions: Solutions for What Ails Us.

November 23, 2014: StepUp Ministry — The Raleigh-based nonprofit StepUp Ministry celebrates 25 successful years of changing lives through job placement, financial literacy, and more. Executive Director Linda Nunnallee, recent program graduate Bobby Atkinston, and volunteer Brandon Lowery talk about StepUp's programs and services including GG's Closet and an entrepreneurship program that's helped both men start their own businesses.

November 16, 2014: Polished Souls' Mike AndersonMike Rae Anderson says "Every Diamond in the Rough is a Soul that deserves to be Polished," and he's working to be part of the fire that helps shape the souls of today's young people. Learn about how this ex-offender, who once faced the death penalty, turned from an abusive childhood and life of crime to the CEO of a foundation called Polished Souls Foundation, Inc. with future plans for a charter school.

November 9, 2014: Charter School Moves to Watch — Charter schools are a viable alternative for parents exploring public school options. Darrell Allison, President of Parents for Educational Freedom in North Carolina, is joined with Joe Ableidinger, Senior Director of Policy and Programs with the Public School Forum of North Carolina, to share new innovations that are increasing accessiblity to charter schools plus questions and factors for parents to consider in their decision-making.

November 2, 2014: Howard Fuller - Black Power to School Reform — A major figure in North Carolina's Black Power and anti-poverty movements, Howard Fuller is today a strong advocate for education and parental choice. He shares stories about his journey and life lessons as recounted in his new book No Struggle No Progress: A Warrior's Life from Black Power to Education Reform.

October 26, 2014: The Right of the Vote — A new voter id law, originated in April 2013 as House Bill 589 the Voter Information Verification Act and signed into law August 12, 2013, will impact when in North Carolinians vote and what the identification requirements will be. Veronica Degraffenreid, Election Preparation and Support Manager for the North Carolina State Board of Elections along with Isela Gutierrez, Associate Research Director with Democracy NC, and Ken Spaulding, Practicing Attorney in Durham and 2016 Gubernatorial Candidate share their insight on this legal matter. Find out what voters need to know now, and why this law has been so hotly contested.

October 19, 2014: Jason Mott Writes Another Wonder — New York Times Bestseller and Wilmington native Jason Mott discusses his new novel The Wonder of All Things, which has already been optioned for screen rights by Lionsgate Entertainment Studios. Mott's first novel The Returned is now the hit TV show Resurrection on ABC. He shares the plot of his new release, which like The Returned explores the supernatural and unexplained.