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Black Issues Forum: 2800 Series (2012-2013)

September 22, 2013 - 50 Years After the March - Thousands participated in the historic 1963 March on Washington for jobs and freedom.  Now, 50 years later, how far have we come in overcoming?   The March on Washington, which took place on August 28th 1963.  While it became a signature event in the Civil Rights Movement marked by Martin Luther King Jr's unforgettable "I Have a Dream Speech," the main goals of the march included a call to action for a comprehensive civil rights bill to end segregated public accommodations and schools, protection of the right to vote, and a federal works program to address unemployment.  Today, we'll bring you the reflections 50 Years After the March by North Carolinians and talk to history professor Dr. David Dennard of East Carolina University and Gene Nichol of the UNC Poverty Center about the progress made on some of the biggest issues that led to the March.

September 15, 2013 - The Kinsey Collection - Married for more than 40 years, Shirley and Bernard Kinsey are native Californians who followed corporate careers with the pursuit of their passion for African American art and culture.  Today, their growing collection includes an early copy of the Emancipation Proclamation. Letters penned by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,  a first-edition book of poetry by Phillis Wheatley, and works or art by renowned African-American artists such as John Biggers and Romare Bearden.  Meet the Kinseys and find out more about this collection that's on display at the Gantt Center for African American Arts and Culture in Charlotte, NC plus other events coming soon to the Gantt.


August 25, 2013 - Rights and Gender
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While we reflect this year on the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, where do issues around women's rights and gender equality fit in?  Dr. Valerie Ann Johnson of Bennett College,  the founder of WomenNC Beth Dehghan, and life-long women's and human rights activist Adrienne Witherspoon share their perspectives.

August 18, 2013 - 50 Years After the March - Thousands participated in the historic 1963 March on Washington for jobs and freedom.  Now, 50 years later, how far have we come in overcoming?   The March on Washington, which took place on August 28th 1963.  While it became a signature event in the Civil Rights Movement marked by Martin Luther King Jr's unforgettable "I Have a Dream Speech," the main goals of the march included a call to action for a comprehensive civil rights bill to end segregated public accommodations and schools, protection of the right to vote, and a federal works program to address unemployment.  Today, we'll bring you the reflections 50 Years After the March by North Carolinians and talk to history professor Dr. David Dennard of East Carolina University and Gene Nichol of the UNC Poverty Center about the progress made on some of the biggest issues that led to the March.


August 5, 2013 - A Monument to the Black Experience (Repeat Episode #2822):  Meet Phil Freelon and Zena Howard, two extraordinarily talented architects in North Carolina who are on the design team building what's set to be the next national landmark. The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a Smithsonian affiliate and broke ground on February 22nd, 2012.  They talk about the vision behind the design as we also hear from other world-class architects on the team with a visit to Washington, DC.


July 28, 2013 - Yolanda Rabun:  Living Her Dreams (Repeat Episode #$2820):  Meet soul/jazz vocal recording artist, theatre performer, and practicing attorney Yolanda Rabun, known in some circles as "the voice." She's collaborated on projects with famously talented artists like the late Soul singer Isaac Hayes, R&B crooner Howard Hewitt, opened for Grammy winner Jennifer Holiday, and recently opened for the Isley Brothers at the Durham Performing Arts Center. Yolanda performs from her debut CD "So Real," discusses her recent release "Hold on to Your Dreams" her corporate life, and how she's fulfilling her dreams in all theaters.

July 21, 2013 - The Highs and Lows of Autism (Repeat Episode #2819): Chances are, you or someone you know has a child with autism.  When a family faces this developmental disability, how do they manage, and how can you be helpful if you're a friend?  Former TV anchor Dwayne Ballen shares his journey with his son in a new book titled "Journey with Julian," and David Laxton of the Autism Society of North Carolina talks about services available as we learn about the highs and lows of autism.

July 14, 2013 - Reclaiming Control After Alzheimer's (Repeat Episode #2818):  If you think you may wind up being your loved one's primary caregiver as they age, you need to know about Alzheimer's Disease.  One in 3 Americans die with this disease, but we'll share the most recent information on preparation and prevention as we talk to genomics expert Dr. Goldie Byrd from NCA&T , Alzheimer's Association Advocate of the Year 2012 and founder of the Alzheimer's awareness organization the Forget Me Not Project Garret Davis, and caregiver Shari Bailey whose story will be featured on the soon-to-launch Alzheimer's News Channel.


July 7, 2013 - New Approaches to Breast Health (Episode #2804): Laugh and cry with Anita Woodley, aka MamaJuggs, in her one-woman drama about breast health, hear the latest science on breast health from Surgical Oncologist Dr. Keith Amos, and see how Pretty in Pink celebrates women surviving breast cancer.

June 30, 2013 - Urban Farming Food for Life (Episode 2824):  Urban and community gardening and farming could be a way to provide fresh fruits and vegetables to residents who live where growing produce has been difficult in the past.  Join City of Lenoir residents David Horn, star of Caldwell Community television's "Two Men and a Stove: Fun in the Kitchen with Ram & Dave" and Vice President for Business Development at Caldwell Memorial Hospital; Mary Norwood, Beall Street Community gardener and community leader; and Lee Carol Giduz, Director of the Caldwell Arts Council and a Beall Street resident and community gardener as they share how they overcame this issue with the development of the Unity Park and Community

June 10, 2013 - The Emancipation Proclamation at 150 (Repeat Episode 2817): While the Emancipation Proclamation is known as the day President Lincoln freed the slaves, according to history, the liberation of all black slaves in America was more of an emancipation process. North Carolina Museum of History curator Earl Ijames provides a clearer picture of the process and shares what visitors can look forward to as the museum presents a fascinating exhibit in honor of the document's 150th birthday.

June 3, 2013 - The Wilmington 10:  A Pardon of Innocence (Repeat Episode 2816): After 40 years of living under a veil of guilt for firebombing a grocery store in Wilmington, ten civil rights activists -- who laer became known as the Wilmington 1 - were finally issued a Pardon of Innocence by former North Carolina Governor Beverly Perdue on the last day of her term as the state's leader. North Carolina native Dr. Ben Chavis, who had worked alongside Dr. Martin Luther King and later served as director of the NAACP, shares his reflections on the ordeal along with Professor Irving Joyner of North Carolina Central University who represented The Wilmington 10 from the day they were accused until their final pardon.

May 26, 2013 - A Monument to the Black Experience (Episode 2822):  Meet Phil Freelon and Zena Howard, two extraordinarily talented architects in North Carolina who are on the design team building what's set to be the next national landmark. The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a Smithsonian affiliate and broke ground on February 22nd, 2012.  They talk about the vision behind the design as we also hear from other world-class architects on the team with a visit to Washington, DC. 

May 19, 2013 - Will Gun Control Really Help? (Episode 2821):   In America, we enjoy the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, as long as now one else gets hurt along the way.  While we know that guns are weapons used to protect or take lives, they're also fascinating instruments people collect or use for recreation.   So when it comes to guns, what kinds of laws do we as a society need to have that will allow Americans to enjoy their rights and keep everybody safe?  Hear from Mayor Bill Bell for the City of Durham who is also a member of Mayors Against Illegal Guns, Gail Neely with North Carolinians Against Gun Violence, and Sergeant Tivon Howard with the Zebulon Police Department

May 12, 2013 - The Highs and Lows of Autism (Repeat Episode #2819): Chances are, you or someone you know has a child with autism.  When a family faces this developmental disability, how do they manage, and how can you be helpful if you're a friend?  Former TV anchor Dwayne Ballen shares his journey with his son in a new book titled "Journey with Julian," and David Laxton of the Autism Society of North Carolina talks about services available as we learn about the highs and lows of autism.

May 5, 2013 - Yolanda Rabun:  Living Her Dreams (Episode #$2820):  Meet soul/jazz vocal recording artist, theatre performer, and practicing attorney Yolanda Rabun, known in some circles as "the voice." She's collaborated on projects with famously talented artists like the late Soul singer Isaac Hayes, R&B crooner Howard Hewitt, opened for Grammy winner Jennifer Holiday, and recently opened for the Isley Brothers at the Durham Performing Arts Center. Yolanda performs from her debut CD "So Real," discusses her recent release "Hold on to Your Dreams" her corporate life, and how she's fulfilling her dreams in all theaters.

April 28, 2013 - They Integrated Duke (Repeat Episode 2815): In 1954 the US Supreme Court outlawed separate but equal public schools with Brown v. Board. About a year later, subsequent to a lawsuit, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill admitted its first five black undergraduates, and it was another 8 years until Duke University followed suit, becoming one of the last major universities to integrate. In a rare interview opportunity, hear first-hand accounts from the three surviving members Gene Kendall, Wilhelmina Reuben-Cooke, and Nathaniel "Nat" White.

April 21, 2013 - Reclaiming Control After Alzheimer's (Episode #2818):  If you think you may wind up being your loved one's primary caregiver as they age, you need to know about Alzheimer's Disease.  One in 3 Americans die with this disease, but we'll share the most recent information on preparation and prevention as we talk to genomics expert Dr. Goldie Byrd from NCA&T , Alzheimer's Association Advocate of the Year 2012 and founder of the Alzheimer's awareness organization the Forget Me Not Project Garret Davis, and caregiver Shari Bailey whose story will be featured on the soon-to-launch Alzheimer's News Channel. 

April 14, 2013 - Philanthropy and Strategic Giving (Repeat Episode 2813): A 2012 Kellogg Foundation reports shows nearly 2/3 of Black households donate 11 billion dollars every year, but are those dollars making thier potential impact on the communities they serve? Philanthropy expert Darryl Lester, fundraising expert and blogger Gail Perry, and Dr. Deborah Bailey share advice on nonprofit sustainability, giving with social impact, and fundraising.

April 7, 2013 The Highs and Lows of Autism (Episode #2819): Chances are, you or someone you know has a child with autism.  When a family faces this developmental disability, how do they manage, and how can you be helpful if you're a friend?  Former TV anchor Dwayne Ballen shares his journey with his son in a new book titled "Journey with Julian," and David Laxton of the Autism Society of North Carolina talks about services available as we learn about the highs and lows of autism.

March 31, 2013 - School to Prison Pipeline Part 2 (Repeat Episode 2812): Part two of a discussion on the School to Prison pipleline taking into consideration the roles of data, racial prejudice, and strategies to turn the tide.message to young people. Hear from Dr. Janet Johnson the CEO and Co-founder of EDSTAR Analytics, Inc., an organization that uses school system data to help schools evaluate programs and develop solutions for improvement; Chris Hill, the Director of the Education and Law Project with the North Carolina Justice Center, and Barbara Fedders, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law with the UNC School of Law who has worked in and researched issues around children-and-the-law, race, and prisoner's rights.

March 24, 2013 - The School to Prison Pipeline Part 1 (Repeat Episode 2811): Only two other states in our nation havehigher suspension rates than North Carolina, and some say it's one of the biggest contributors to the School to Prison Pipeline.   A former teacher, law enforcement officer, and parent share their observations on how this pipeline is created and why so many African American children are funneled into it.

March 17, 2013 - Music with a Message (Repeat Episode 2809): To get a message to young people, Hip Hop and rap music work.  Learn how this music changed the life of local rap artist Thomas RaShad Easley and how he's returning the favor and using his administrative position at a university to set people on a right path.  RaShad performs in studio, talks about using explicit  lyrics in his message, and shares the story of his Christian journey.

March 10, 2013 - North Carolina's First Black Legislator (Repeat Episode #2808): In the book "Freedom by Fire," North Carolina author Dr. David Cecelski tells the story of Abraham Galloway, a slave who escaped Eastern North Carolina to freedom, served as a spy for the Union Army, and went on to be elected Senator twice. Cecelski gives detailed accounts from and discusses the book

March 3, 2013 - A Hard Look at Poverty in NC (Episode #2807): During the 2012 election season, we've heard much about the plight of the middle class. But what about the plight of the poor? The North Carolina NAACP and 4 other organizations want to make this a national agenda item. Find out what poor people say their needs are through a report on the Truth and Hope Poverty Tour.

February 24, 2013 - New Approaches to Breast Health (Episode #2804): Laugh and cry with Anita Woodley, aka MamaJuggs, in her one-woman drama about breast health, hear the latest science on breast health from Surgical Oncologist Dr. Keith Amos, and see how Pretty in Pink celebrates women surviving breast cancer.

Feb. 17, 2013 - The Emancipation Proclamation at 150 (Episode 2817): While the Emancipation Proclamation is known as the day President Lincoln freed the slaves, according to history, the liberation of all black slaves in America was more of an emancipation process. North Carolina Museum of History curator Earl Ijames provides a clearer picture of the process and shares what visitors can look forward to as the museum presents a fascinating exhibit in honor of the document's 150th birthday.

Feb. 10, 2013 - The Wilmington 10:  A Pardon of Innocence (Episode 2816): After 40 years of living under a veil of guilt for firebombing a grocery store in Wilmington, ten civil rights activists -- who laer became known as the Wilmington 1 - were finally issued a Pardon of Innocence by former North Carolina Governor Beverly Perdue on the last day of her term as the state's leader. North Carolina native Dr. Ben Chavis, who had worked alongside Dr. Martin Luther King and later served as director of the NAACP, shares his reflections on the ordeal along with Professor Irving Joyner of North Carolina Central University who represented The Wilmington 10 from the day they were accused until their final pardon.

Feb. 3, 2013 - They Integrated Duke (Episode 2815): In 1954 the US Supreme Court outlawed separate but equal public schools with Brown v. Board. About a year later, subsequent to a lawsuit, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill admitted its first five black undergraduates, and it was another 8 years until Duke University followed suit, becoming one of the last major universities to integrate. In a rare interview opportunity, hear first-hand accounts from the three surviving members Gene Kendall, Wilhelmina Reuben-Cooke, and Nathaniel "Nat" White.

Jan. 27, 2013 - The 19th Annual Hayti Heritage Film Festival (Episode 2814): This year's showcase of films created by African Americans from North Carolina and beyond include everything from fiction and feature-length entertainment, to independent shorts and documentaries. Find out what this year's Hayti Heritage Film Festival has in store as the festival's curator Marc Lee presents preview clips along with filmakers Eric Barstow and Katina Parker. 

Jan. 20, 2013 - Philanthropy and Strategic Giving (Episode 2813): A 2012 Kellogg Foundation reports shows nearly 2/3 of Black households donate 11 billion dollars every year, but are those dollars making thier potential impact on the communities they serve? Philanthropy expert Darryl Lester, fundraising expert and blogger Gail Perry, and Dr. Deborah Bailey share advice on nonprofit sustainability, giving with social impact, and fundraising.

Jan. 13, 2013 - School to Prison Pipeline Part 2 (Episode 2812): Part two of a discussion on the School to Prison pipleline taking into consideration the roles of data, racial prejudice, and strategies to turn the tide.message to young people. Hear from Dr. Janet Johnson the CEO and Co-founder of EDSTAR Analytics, Inc., an organization that uses school system data to help schools evaluate programs and develop solutions for improvement; Chris Hill, the Director of the Education and Law Project with the North Carolina Justice Center, and Barbara Fedders, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law with the UNC School of Law who has worked in and researched issues around children-and-the-law, race, and prisoner's rights.

Jan. 6, 2013 - The School to Prison Pipeline Part 1 (Episode 2811): Only two other states in our nation havehigher suspension rates than North Carolina, and some say it's one of the biggest contributors to the School to Prison Pipeline.   A former teacher, law enforcement officer, and parent share their observations on how this pipeline is created and why so many African American children are funneled into it.

Dec. 30, 2012 - Romare Bearden at Reynolda (Episode #2806): Reynolda House Museum provides a rare opportunity to view the works of American artist Romare Bearden, and Winston Salem provides other cultural sites to build a destination weekend focused on African American history and culture.

Dec. 23, 2012 - A Christmas Concert with Nnenna Freelon & John Brown (Episode 2810):  Music for the season featuring North Carolina's own Nnenna Freelon and John Brown. They perform numbers from their new Holiday CD  "Christmas" and talk about the collaboration.

Dec. 16, 2012 - Music with a Message (Episode 2809): To get a message to young people, Hip Hop and rap music work.  Learn how this music changed the life of local rap artist Thomas RaShad Easley and how he's returning the favor and using his administrative position at a university to set people on a right path.  RaShad performs in studio, talks about using explicit  lyrics in his message, and shares the story of his Christian journey.

Nov. 25, 2012 - North Carolina's First Black Legislator (Episode #2808): In the book "Freedom by Fire," North Carolina author Dr. David Cecelski tells the story of Abraham Galloway, a slave who escaped Eastern North Carolina to freedom, served as a spy for the Union Army, and went on to be elected Senator twice. Cecelski gives detailed accounts from and discusses the book. 

Nov. 18, 2012 - A Hard Look at Poverty in NC (Episode #2807): During the 2012 election season, we've heard much about the plight of the middle class. But what about the plight of the poor? The North Carolina NAACP and 4 other organizations want to make this a national agenda item. Find out what poor people say their needs are through a report on the Truth and Hope Poverty Tour.

Nov. 11, 2012 - Romare Bearden at Reynolda (Episode #2806): Reynolda House Museum provides a rare opportunity to view the works of American artist Romare Bearden, and Winston Salem provides other cultural sites to build a destination weekend focused on African American history and culture.

Nov. 4, 2012 - Understanding the Affordable Care Act (Episode #2805): On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act. While many have since celebrated the passage of this law comparing its impact to that of Medicare, efforts to repeal the law continue. Doctors discuss the benefits and costs of Obamacare.

Oct. 28, 2012 - New Approaches to Breast Health (Episode #2804): In recognition of October as Breast Cancer Awareness month, laugh and cry with Anita Woodley, aka MamaJuggs, in her one-woman drama about breast health, hear the latest science on breast health from Surgical Oncologist Dr. Keith Amos, and see how Pretty in Pink celebrates women surviving breast cancer.

Oct. 14, 2012 - HBCU Town Hall on Election 2012 Part 2 (Episode #2802): State HBCU students & special guests from Demos, CIRCLE, Mobilize.org, SEEN, and Johnson C. Smith University gather for part two of a discussion on youth political engagement and the top concerns of the millennial generation during the 2012 election cycle, like student loan debt and high unemployment. Student audience poses questions to expert panel.

Oct. 21, 2012 - Rediscovering Nina Simone (Episode #2803): Her moniker is "the High Priestess of Soul", and she hails from Tryon, North Carolina. Right now, her story is on display at UNC's Sonja Haynes Stone Center. We'll explore this artist and more about her extraordinary life from child prodigy to civil rights icon.

Oct. 7, 2012 - HBCU Town Hall on Election 2012 Part 1 (Episode #2801): State HBCU students & special guests from Demos, CIRCLE, Mobilize.org, SEEN, and Johnson C. Smith University gather for a two-part discussion on youth political engagement and the top concerns of the millennial generation during the 2012 election cycle, like student loan debt and high unemployment. Experts lay out the economic landscape for 20- and 30-somethings in part 1 of this college assembly.